What happens to Spot?

May 21, 2009

For many families with pets, the pets are truly a part of the family.  Unfortunately, the law largely treats animals as nothing more than property.  Despite prior proposals to the contrary, Wisconsin law does not have any special provisions for pet custody.  Divorcing spouses are often unable to agree upon what happens to a beloved pet or pet.  There is no uniform way that Wisconsin courts will handle such a dispute.  As with so many divorce issues, the outcome is going to depend upon case-specific facts.

Even though there are no special provisions in the law, pet custody arrangements may still be enforced by Court order if approved by the Judge assigned to the case.  These are some of the proposed agreements I have seen approved by Courts:

  • Dividing multiple pets between spouses.  This tends to arise in families with more than one cat, and only works well if the pets do not develop separation anxiety due to being apart from one another.

 

  • Having the pet travel back and forth between the parents’ homes with the human children.  This occurs mainly with dogs.  Some parents believe that the consistency of having a beloved dog with a child as she travels is comparable to having one’s siblings with them.  This can be problematic if one parent is not really devoted to the dog, however.

 

  • Giving one spouse the pet, with rights to visitation for the other spouse.

It is important to keep in mind that sharing custody of a pet often entails working out the right to make decisions (such as when it would be appropriate to euthanize a pet), medical issues (are you going to treat the arthritis with prescription medication?) and payments of grooming, boarding or vet expenses.   One can expect to encounter some of the same issues that tend to arise in co-parenting human children.   As a result, sharing pet custody means there must be an ongoing relationship between spouses, even after the divorce is final, and even if there are no children involved.  

Pet disputes are often difficult to resolve even with the assistance of attorneys or mediators.  If negotiation fails, the Court will decide what happens.  However, Courts are often not equipped to decide what is best for pets and will usually simply choose a “winner” – the person who gets the pet.  

In my experience, Judges tend to give weight to the person who has registered a pet, paid the vet bills, or provided the majority of the past care.  Chances are that the person who bore the brunt of the burden of caring for the pet could be awarded the animal as part of the property division.

The law provides no magic solution for couples caught in these battles.  Should the Wisconsin law be changed to provide greater Court authority to determine pet custody issues?

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